Artful Intersection Community Paint Day

Installation of the Artful Intersection planned for the top of Cabbage Hill will commence on Sept. 11, followed by a Community Paint Day on Sept. 18. Motorists should be advised of street closures in the area on both days.

September 11 | 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.

– W. Vine St. at E. Filbert St.

– W. Strawberry St. between Vine St. and St. Joseph St.

September 18 | 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.

– W. Vine St. at E. Filbert St., and between St. Joseph St. to W. Strawberry St./Mulberry St. intersection

– W. Strawberry St. at High St., and between Vine St. and St. Joseph St.

– S. Mulberry St. at King St.

Residents living on W. Vine St. may use the St. Joseph’s Church parking lot as a detour thru to St. Joseph St. between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on both days of closure. All motorists should follow posted detours on both days of closure.

A street mural created by artist Fern Dannis in partnership with Peter Barber of Two Dudes Painting Company using input from the community will help improve pedestrian safety and enhance public space at the intersection of W. Strawberry St., W. Vine St. and S. Mulberry St.

This five-way intersection is a sometimes-confusing space integral to neighborhood and city-wide traffic circulation. The artful intersection is expected to expand the perceived public space to encompass the street; increase awareness and safety of alternative forms of transportation, and boost community development.

The project team welcomes the community to attend the Community Paint Day on September 18. Those wishing to volunteer can sign up at here.

Dannis and Barber were selected by a project team, including site neighbors, arts professionals and a Public Art Advisory Board (PAAB) member.

This project is part of the Bloomberg Foundation’s Asphalt Art Initiative grant program, which embraces art as an effective and relatively low-cost strategy to activate their streets. The City of Lancaster is one of 16 cities to receive this grant, in partnership with SoWe, a resident-led community initiative of Tenfold (formerly Tabor/LHOP).

For more information about Artful Intersections and the project process, visit engage.cityoflancasterpa.com/en/projects/artful-intersections-cabbage-hill.

SoWe residents continue to shape SouthWest neighborhood’s future

Follow-up survey launches to track SoWe initiative’s progress and future planning

SoWe, an initiative of Tenfold, announced the launch of a follow-up survey that will give Southwest Lancaster residents an opportunity to share their feedback on current neighborhood needs, resource gaps, and the impact of SoWe investments that have occurred since the original survey and SoWe initiative was launched in 2016. This will give the SoWe initiative the opportunity to track progress made over the past five years and shape planning efforts for the next five years.

The follow-up survey will mirror the original survey that was conducted as part of the Wells Fargo Regional Foundation Neighborhood Planning Grant in 2016. Millersville University’s Center for Public Scholarship and Social Change will work with the SoWe initiative to administer the follow-up survey and complete the data analysis.

SoWe residents will receive the survey via a mailing and other activities that are planned over the next couple months. SoWe residents can complete the survey by clicking here. SoWe residents are strongly encouraged to participate, as their feedback will be used to set the vision, strategy and objectives for SoWe neighborhood investment over the next five years.

Since inception, the SoWe initiative has leveraged over $5.8 million dollars to support the SoWe neighborhood and its residents. By listening to neighborhood feedback, the SoWe initiative has invested in affordable housing, public parks and street scape, youth programing and education, community safety, neighborhood connections and economic opportunity. Major successes of the SoWe initiative include the renovation of Culliton Park, the establishment of Price Elementary as a Community School, renovation of neighborhood housing for affordable homeownership and rental opportunities, investments into private housing to include an Affordable Home Repair program and the Façade Improvement Program.

Strawberry Hill Artful Intersection: Community Engagement Part 1 Recap

A big thank you to all the residents who came out to Two Dudes Painting Co. for the Strawberry Hill Artful Intersection Community Engagement Session. If you were not able to attend, do not worry, here is a recap with meeting materials and videos!

The session started with a brief Powerpoint presentation by Fern Dannis with examples of other asphalt art projects, project scope, and timeline. Jim Gerhart outlined the historical context of this intersection.

Participants were given site maps and tracing paper to make notes or sketches, along with a handout of suggested ideas.

Project Engagement Timeline:

May 28 – Community Survey launched on engage.cityoflancasterpa.com.

June 3 – Mini Artist Workshop Session #1, @Two Dudes from 5:00pm – 7:00pm

June 17 – Mini Artist Workshop Session #2, Culliton Park from 5:00 – 7:00pm

June 22Mayor’s Neighborhood Week Event at Culliton ParkProject Outreach

June 26 – Mini Artist Workshop Session #3, @ St. Joseph’s school parking lot, from 10am – 12pm

June 28 – Community Survey Closes

July 16 – Artist Team to Present Mural Concepts for Feedback

August 6 – Mural design Finalized

September - Project installation - September 11th, Rain Date Sept. 18th

Strawberry Hill Artful Intersection

Hello SoWe ! Let’s make some art.

The City of Lancaster is working with local artist, Fern Dannis, along with Two Dudes Painting Company to create an artful intersection at the  Strawberry Hill intersection.  This project is part of the Bloomberg Foundation’s Asphalt Art Initiative to create street murals and other creative interventions to improve pedestrian safety and enhance public spaces.

The intersection of West Strawberry Street, West Vine Street, and South Mulberry Street sits at the top of Cabbage Hill. This five-way intersection is a confusing space for pedestrians and vehicles and is integral to the neighborhood and city-wide traffic circulation. Public engagement is beginning  June 3rd, with the artwork being designed over the summer. The final application of paint-to-asphalt is set for September 11, 2021.

Community Engagement Sessions dates are below and are open to the public! Join us!
June 3rd 5:30 – 7:00 at Two Dudes Painting Co.– 750 Poplar St. Lancaster, PA 17603
June 26th 10:00 – 12:00 at 47 S. Mulberry St. Parking Lot

Cant make the community events but still want to provide feedback? Fill out this survey.

What is an artful intersection?
Artful Intersections connect artists and neighbors to work together to create street murals in their neighborhoods. The street murals serve as a reflection of the life and culture of the neighborhood; it is expected to expand the perceived public space to encompass the street; increase awareness and safety of alternative forms of transportation, and boost community development.

To learn more about the project, please visit https://engage.cityoflancasterpa.com. We are asking residents to respond to a community survey to provide input on pedestrian safety and the artwork for the intersection.

To view similar asphalt art projects, visit the Bloomberg Asphalt Art Initiative Website https://asphaltart.bloomberg.org/.

The Search for the Oldest House on Cabbage Hill

Jim Gerhart, May 2021

Cabbage Hill was nothing but forest, farmland, and pasture until 1762 when Bethelstown was laid out with 66 building lots on the first two blocks of what would become Manor and High Streets. Bethelstown grew slowly; by 1815, more than 50 years after its founding, there were only about 25-30 houses on its 66 lots. Nearly all of the houses were one-story houses made of logs and rough-sawn wood.

Most of the original houses on Manor and High were later replaced by two- and three-story brick houses built in the second half of the nineteenth century. However, at least one of the charter-member houses of old Bethelstown lasted well into the twentieth century before being razed—a log house with weatherboarding that used to stand at 442 Manor before it was taken down in 1963 to make room for a parking lot.

Which raises the question: Was 442 Manor the only survivor of the original 25-30 one-story houses from old Bethelstown, or is it possible that more of the original one-story houses are still present, hiding behind modern vinyl siding and form-stone? Most of the historical sources needed to answer this question are available online. The only one not completely online is county tax lists, and the staff of LancasterHistory was kind enough to supply the lists for the years not yet online.

Using Google Maps, I was surprised to discover that 27 one-story houses are still present in the 400 and 500 blocks of Manor and High. Of the 27, nine are single houses, fourteen are in seven house pairs, and four are grouped together in a connected row of houses. Using newspaper articles, city directories, street maps, property deeds, and other sources, I was able to determine that 20 of the 27 current one-story houses in the first two blocks of Manor and High were built in 1850 or later, and therefore are not old enough to be original houses from old Bethelstown. The remaining seven possibilities—two on Manor and five on High—were investigated in more detail.

The one-story log house at 433 High (right) and the one-story
frame house at 435 High (left). Author’s photo, 2021.

Of the seven houses that predate 1850, five were found to have been built in the 1840s, leaving just two—433 and 435 High Street—that had the potential to be old enough to be original Bethelstown houses. A couple of key deeds and tax records show that these two one-story houses, which are next-door neighbors on the northwest side of the 400 block of High, were built on Bethelstown lot 28, and that both houses were already present in 1840. The deeds show that 433 is a log house, adding to the potential that it could have been built quite a bit before 1840.

Making things a little more challenging, detailed maps and city directories do not exist before 1840, and many pre-1840 deeds that would be helpful seem to have gone unrecorded or have been lost. Consequently, tax lists took on a more important role in tracking these two houses before 1840. The continuity from year to year in the amount of ground rent paid for the lot, as well as the assessed value of the houses, enabled me to trace 433 and 435 High back in time before 1840 with some success. Also helpful were occasional notes written by the tax assessor when the properties were bought or sold.[1] 

The result is that “YES” is my answer to the question of whether any of the 25-30 houses from the pre-1815 days of old Bethelstown have survived. The weight of the evidence points to the one-story log house at 433 High as the oldest surviving house on the Hill. It appears to have been built no later than about 1801, and possibly earlier. Not surprisingly, because they are neighboring houses on the same original lot, the one-story frame house at 435 High also is old, having been built about 1814. I believe these two are the oldest surviving houses on Cabbage Hill—older by at least a couple decades than Catharine Yeates’ 1838 summer cottage at 613 Fremont, previously considered the oldest survivor. 

Part of county tax lists for 1840 that shows the properties on which Peter Bier III paid taxes. Note the second listing for Bier, which is for two houses on one lot in Bethelstown. These houses are now 433 and 435 High Street. Bier III paid ground rent of seven shillings on the lot, and the two houses together were valued at $360.

So, who built these historic houses at 433 and 435 High, and who were their early owners? The early history of the houses involves a couple generations of the Bier family. Peter Bier, Sr. (1701-1781) was a German immigrant who arrived in this country in 1748, bringing with him a teenaged son, Peter, Jr. (1732-1801), and settling in Lancaster about 1760. Peter, Jr. was a cordwainer (shoemaker) living in the southeast part of the city, but owning several other houses and significant acreage, including on the Hill. Peter, Jr. married Elizabeth Buch in 1760 at First Reformed Church, and they had a son, Peter III (1763-1843). Peter III also was a shoemaker, but later in life a farmer. Peter III and his wife Catharine had several children, including a fourth-generation Peter (1797-1849) who became a doctor.

Peter Bier, Jr., who died in 1801, appears to have acquired Bethelstown lot 28 shortly before his death. Peter, Jr. may have built the house now at 433 High as soon as he acquired the lot, or the lot may have already had the house on it when he acquired it. If Peter, Jr. built it, the house dates to about 1800-01; if lot 28 already had a house on it when he bought it, the house dates to the late 1700s and was built by an unknown first owner. I suspect the house was already there when Peter, Jr. bought the lot, because he died within six months, and probably would not have had the time to build a house. This means the house likely was built in the late 1700s.

As part of Peter, Jr.’s estate, lot 28 and the house on it was inherited by his widow Elizabeth. She may have lived in the house for a short time, but mostly she rented the house to a series of tenants, including, in the years immediately following Peter, Jr.’s death, to John Williams, a young mason who decades later would end up owning most of the land in the southern half of Cabbage Hill. Also, a few records suggest that John Drepperd may have lived in the house in the early 1810s. Drepperd was a gunmaker whose father and grandfather were both famous gunmakers supplying rifles for troops in the Revolutionary War.

Sometime about 1814, the widow Bier (or her son Peter III) seems to have added a frame house to lot 28 (now 435 High). Both houses were occupied by tenants for the next 10 years or so, but then, about 1824, Elizabeth transferred the deed for the lot and houses to her son Peter III. Peter III continued to rent the houses to tenants up until 1841 when he sold lot 28 and both houses to Jacob Liphart, a real-estate investor who lived in Marietta.

Map of part of the 400 block of High Street in 1850, showing the one-story houses  at 433 (owned by John Zimmerer) and 435 (owned by Robert Boas).  From Moody and Bridgens.

Liphart rented the houses out for a short while, and then split the 62-foot-wide lot in half, with the northeast half containing the one-story log house now numbered 433 High, and the southwest half containing the one-story frame house now numbered 435 High. In 1844, Liphart sold the half with 433 to John Zimmerer, a middle-aged tailor and his wife Sarah. Earlier, in 1842, Liphart had sold the half with 435 to Robert Boas, a middle-aged laborer, his wife Franciska, and their young son. Both Zimmerer and Boas were German immigrants, and both families lived in the houses they had bought, each of which was valued at $220 in 1845.

Part of  1857 deed (Book I, Volume 14, Page 478) with mention of the log house at what is now 433 High.

John Zimmerer died in 1857, and his wife Sarah sold the log house at 433 to Jacob and Susan Glassbrenner for $300. The Glassbrenner family lived in the house for a few years and then rented it out to tenants. After Jacob died, his widow Susan, who had moved to Philadelphia, sold the house to William Lebkicher in 1906.

Robert and Franciska Boas lived in the frame house at 435 High for many years. Sometime in the 1860s, they added the two-story brick house next door at 437 High, squeezing it into the remaining part of their lot. Boas and his wife moved into the larger 437 and rented 435 out to tenants until Boas’s death. In 1881, the frame house at 435 High and its larger brick companion at 437 were sold as part of Boas’s estate for $1,000 to John Kirsch. In 1920, after Kirsch had died, the courts granted the property to his widow Barbara at a value of $500 as part of her widow’s exemption.

Map of part of the 400 block of High Street in 1897, showing the one-story log house at 433 High and the one-story frame house at 435 High, as well as the two-story brick house at 437 High that was added next to 435 in the 1860s.  From Sanborn Fire Insurance Map.

Today, Peter Bier III would have difficulty recognizing his houses. The one-story log house at 433 High is covered with vinyl siding, and the one-story frame house at 435 High is sheathed in gray form-stone. Both houses have had their original doors, windows, and roofs replaced. Dormers have been replaced or enlarged, and concrete steps now lead up to the front doors. But behind all the modern features, more than 200 years of history lie hidden.

It is my belief that 433 and 435 High Street are the only two houses that survive from the original 25-30 houses built in old Bethelstown between 1762 and 1815. Since Bethelstown preceded the development of the rest of the Hill, these two houses also are the oldest surviving houses on all of Cabbage Hill.

Sometimes a little historical sleuthing can uncover some remarkable stories hiding just behind modern siding and form-stone on the old houses on the Hill.

SoWe Facade Grants and Home Repair Loan Program OPEN!

Lancaster City Alliance is accepting Façade Grant applications from May 1st to June 15th. SoWe residents are eligible to apply for funds to improve the exterior of their homes. This a matching grant; residents and businesses are eligible to receive up to $5,000 per property. For program details and to see if you qualify contact Alex Otthofer at aotthofer@teamlanc.org  or 717.696.6206. Staff is available to assist in English and Spanish.

More information about the Façade Program can be found on our website here

SoWe also offers a low cost, low interest loans for residents to make necessary repairs to their homes through our Home Repair Program. Home Owners are encouraged to apply if they need financial support to make renovations. Applicants are required to find their own contractors. Contact Jake Thorsen if you’re interested in learning more about the program!

Program Guidelines

Emergency Rental Assistance Program

The Emergency Rental Assistance Program is open and eligible households may receive up to 12 months of assistance, including rent, utility, and other housing related costs. This program is in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and aimed to alleviate renters who are struggling from a loss of income.

To find more information about the program and to see if you qualify visit Lancasterhelp.Rent or view the one page info sheets below.

SoWe and its partners are assisting residents to complete their application. If you need assistance or have questions please contact our team to schedule a time to meet.

Available locations for application assistance in SoWe and Lancaster City:

BASE Inc (By appointment)
447 S. Prince Street, Lancaster, PA 17603
Monday – Friday, 9am-5pm
Contact: dmartinez@baseinc.org or 717-742-0115

Bright Side Opportunities Center
515 Hershey Avenue, Lancaster, PA 17603
Bilingual staff available to assist
Hours: By appointment
To contact: 717-509-1342

Community Action Partnership (CAP)
601 S. Queen Street, Lancaster, PA 17603
Bilingual staff able to assist
Hours: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10am-1pm, 2-4pm, by appointment
To contact: 717-299-7301

Crispus Attucks
407 Howard Avenue, Lancaster, PA 17602
Hours: Mondays, 9am-12pm, 1-5pm, Fridays 9am-12pm, by appointment
To contact: 717-394-6604

Parish Resource Center

Hours: Sunday 5-6pm at Grace Lutheran Church, 517 N. Queen St., Lancaster, PA (Parking lot)
Monday 5-6pm at East Chestnut Street Mennonite Church, 432 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster PA (Front foyer)
Tuesday 5-6pm at Shaarai Shomayim, 75 E. James St., Lancaster, PA (Sidewalk on Duke St.)

To contact: (717) 299-1113 or info@parishresourcecenter.org

Price Elementary
615 Fairview Avenue, Lancaster, PA 17603
Bilingual staff available to assist by appointment
Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:30am-4pm. Evening hours by appointment
To contact: 717-291-6252

SoWe
417 Poplar Street, Lancaster, PA 17603
Bilingual staff able to assist
Hours: By appointment
To contact: 717-669-3633 or lpagan@bgclanc.org

Tabor/LHOP
308 E. King Street, Lancaster, PA 17602
Bilingual staff able to assist
Hours: By appointment
To contact: 717-291-9945 ext. 194 or brivera@lhop.org

Bloomberg Philanthropies Grant Creates Opportunity for Creative Traffic Interventions

The City of Lancaster has been awarded a $25,000 national grant from Bloomberg Philanthropies, in partnership with the SoWe Neighborhood Group and the Lancaster Housing Opportunity Partnership to create a street mural at the intersection of West Strawberry, South Mulberry, and West Vine Streets in the Cabbage Hill neighborhood. Support is also being provided by Sherwin Williams. This project is supported by a grant from the Bloomberg Philanthropies Asphalt Art Initiative which helps cities use art and community engagement to improve street safety and revitalize public space. The focus of the initiative is asphalt art: visual interventions on roadways, pedestrian spaces, and vertical infrastructure. Lancaster is one of 16 cities to receive the grant. 

“To achieve the goals and programs outlined in our Ten-Year Plan for Public Art, we rely on grants like this. The support allows us to work directly with community members to create projects in their neighborhoods. An exciting part of this project is how it puts artists and neighbors together to solve design problems while working together with planners and engineers in our Department of Public Works. ” said Joanna Davis, City of Lancaster Public Art Manager. 

The project is in its early stages and set to develop through the summer of 2021 with the goal to install in early fall.  A steering committee consisting of Cabbage Hill residents, arts professionals and a member of the Public Art Advisory Board has begun to meet. The steering committee will help to move the project along by assisting in community outreach efforts, artist selection, and design review.  

“Public art has many useful definitions, but for our Lancaster community it needs to involve the public. This intersection [project] at Vine, Mulberry and Strawberry is about the decisions and process through which the art will come to be. It’s an exciting time–so get involved and make your voice heard!” said Mimi Shapiro, City of Lancaster resident, artist, and Steering Committee member. 

The artist call can be found here!

The community can send feedback or questions about this project to the project manager Yarlyn Rosario at yrosario@cityoflancasterpa.com.  

For additional information about other projects in the Asphalt Art Initiative, visit, https://asphaltart.bloomberg.org/.   

Welcome Mike Osango

Please join Tabor Community Services, Inc./ Lancaster Housing Opportunity Partnership in giving Mike Osango a warm welcome to the team, as the new SoWe Coordinator. He will focus on the management of special projects, administrative support, as well as communications and marketing for the Tabor/LHOP’s SoWe initiative. Mike is no stranger to the team since he interned with us, while completing his undergraduate work at Millersville University, where he earned a BA in Communications and Business Administration. Most recently Mike worked for PNC Bank. Mike was born in New Jersey and his family is from Africa, where he lived for 10 years before returning to the US. Mike is quadrilingual, and can speak French, English, Spanish, and Lingala. Mike is a new father and loves sports, cars, and helping people, the latter of which he is especially excited to bring to the team.

The Streets of Cabbage Hill

(Plus a Valentine’s Day request)

Jim Gerhart, February 2021

A quiz for Cabbage Hill residents: Which of the following five street names were actual street names on Cabbage Hill in the nineteenth century? (1) Buttonwood Alley, (2) Roberts Street, (3) West Washington Street, (4) Williams Lane, and (5) Slab Alley.

The answer to the quiz: All five were actual street names on the Hill. OK, maybe the question is a little unfair, even for old-timers. You would have to be well over 100  years old to have any in-person memory of some of the street names in the quiz.

The point is that the names of many of the streets on the Hill have changed over the past 200 years. Specifically, there are 12 main streets in the historic core of Cabbage Hill, which is bounded by Manor, West Strawberry, Fremont, and Fairview. Those 12 streets have had more than 30 different names.

Streets on Cabbage Hill in the mid to late 1850s, shown on an 1858 map. From T.J. Kennedy’s Map of Lancaster.

Manor Street, the oldest street on the Hill, was already a well-traveled Native American trading trail when Lancaster was founded in 1729. It was known as the Blue Rock Road in the mid to late 1700s, because it led to an early ferry across the Susquehanna at Blue Rock just south of Washington Boro. In the early 1800s, the southwestern stretch of the street was often called the Manor Turnpike, because of the toll levied on travelers as they crossed the southwestern city limits. Finally, in the mid-1800s, the street became known as Manor Street.  

West Strawberry Street is the second oldest street on the Hill, having been a dirt cowpath that marked the southwest edge of central Lancaster when James Hamilton laid out his building lots in 1729. It was known as Slab Alley as late as the 1840s and then in the early 1850s, it became West Strawberry, to distinguish it from its continuation known as East Strawberry on the other side of South Queen Street.

On the opposite end of the historic core of the Hill, Fairview Avenue has been around a long time as a connecting road to South Prince and South Queen at Engleside. From the mid-1800s to 1915, it was called Love Lane, and it has been Fairview Avenue since then. The change of name to Fairview makes sense because it runs along a ridge from which expansive views were possible. I can find no explanation for its first, more amorous, name.

High Street originated with the founding of Bethelstown in 1762 when building lots were laid out on either side of its first two blocks (400 and 500 blocks). By the 1850s, High had been extended southwest to Love Lane, bridging the small stream at the bottom of the hill where New Dorwart is today. Presumably it was called High because of the location of the 400 block on a high point known as Dinah’s Hill.

St. Joseph Street has a complicated naming history. The 400 block of St. Joseph was established in 1850 when St. Joseph Catholic Church was built. At the time the church was built, the street it fronted was called Union Street (not to be confused with today’s Union a few blocks to the southeast, which didn’t exist yet). Then, in the early 1850s, just to make things even more confusing, the street was sometimes referred to as Poplar Street (before today’s Poplar a block over was established). Finally, by the end of the 1850s, the 400 and 500 blocks were renamed St. Joseph. However, at that time, St. Joseph did not extend beyond what is now New Dorwart, and in the meantime the 700 block between Fairview and Laurel had been laid out, and the street there was known as West Washington Street. In the late 1850s, when the two streets were connected by the building of a bridge over the small stream at the future New Dorwart, the entire street became known as St. Joseph.

Part of an article establishing Block Committees in the Southwest Ward, in which the early names of some streets are referred to; from the Daily Evening Express, December 15, 1857.

Now that we’ve brought up Poplar Street……When St. Joseph Church was built in 1850, the small alley behind the church with no houses on it had no name. In the late 1850s, it became Poplar and it was extended to the stream at the bottom of the hill at about the same time the future 700 block of Poplar was laid out on the far side of the stream. In 1870, building lots were laid out on the east side of the 400 block of Poplar. A year later, on the other side of the stream, the 700 block was named Poplar Alley. In the late 1870s, the street was connected with a bridge over the stream, and the whole street was named Poplar Street.

Moving farther east, Fremont Street was established in the late 1850s, starting with the 700 block between Fairview and Laurel. In 1870, when the building lots were laid out along the 400 block of Poplar, so too were building lots on both sides of the 400 block of Fremont. In the early 1870s, the two ends of Fremont were connected by completing the street in between them. Like Love Lane, I don’t know the origin of the name of Fremont Street, although when the street was first laid out in the 1850s, John C. Fremont was a popular national personality who had been an explorer of the West and then the Republican opponent of James Buchanan in the 1856 presidential election.

Now heading back to the west……West Vine Street started as a narrow alley behind the Bethelstown lots that fronted on the southeast side of High in 1762. The first inkling of the street that would become West Vine was born between Fairview and Laurel, where Buttonwood Alley was established in the late 1850s. When the blocks to the northwest up to West Strawberry were established by the 1880s, they were called Buttonwood Street. Buttonwood was renamed West Vine in 1890 as the southwestern continuation of the older West Vine on the other side of West Strawberry.

Next, to a street that cuts across the Hill from the northwest to the southeast—Laurel Street. It was first named in the early 1850s when it was a private lane providing access to the 25-acre property of John Williams between Manor and St. Joseph, and naturally enough it was called Williams Lane. In the 1860s, it was briefly known as New German Street, and then just New Street, and by about 1870, it became known as Laurel Alley, possibly named for local vegetation. From about 1885 to today, it has been Laurel Street.

Part of an article describing the city’s plan for naming alleys in the 8th Ward; from the Intelligencer Journal, November 21, 1871.

Another northwest-southeast street is Filbert Street. From the establishment of Bethelstown in 1762, there had always been an alley where the first block of Filbert is now. In the late 1850s to early 1860s, it was known locally as Gougler’s Alley, so named because of the house of Jacob and Rebecca Gougler at its intersection with Manor. But it wasn’t until 1871, when the city named or renamed all its alleys, that it became Filbert Alley. About 1890, Filbert Alley was promoted to Filbert Street. Because of irregular property boundaries near the old St. Joseph Cemetery, Filbert had to be offset slightly at St. Joseph Street.

Another alley that eventually grew up to be a street is Lafayette Street. In old Bethelstown, the lots on the southeast side of Manor extended back to meet the lots on the northwest side of High. They met at a narrow alley that would eventually become Lafayette Alley. In the late 1850s, houses had started to be built fronting the alley and the 400 block of the alley was widened to become Lafayette Street. At the same time, the 700 block of Lafayette was established, with a gap in the street where the 500 and 600 blocks would soon be. By about 1890, the two developed ends of the street met in the middle, making one continuous Lafayette Street. The street may have been named for the Lafayette Hotel, which existed on Manor in the 1840s and 1850s, and backed to the alley that would become Lafayette.

All the streets that run from West Strawberry to Fairview had to contend with the small stream that used to run where New Dorwart is today. For most of those streets, the last segments to be built (the 500 and 600 blocks) were the ones nearest the stream. In the 1860s, it appears that a rough path that ran along the stream valley was known as Roberts Lane, likely named for Anthony Roberts who owned land nearby. In the 1880s, the city placed a 6-foot-high brick sewer under the stream, diverted the stream into it, and built New Dorwart on top of it. New Dorwart was first named South Dorwart, a name that faded gradually over time and was finally replaced with New Dorwart about the 1920s. New Dorwart had to be offset at Lafayette, and again at High, because of bends in the now-vanished stream around which early houses had to be built.

Now, if your eyes have not yet completely glazed over with all these street names………In honor of this month’s Valentine’s Day, if anybody has any ideas on why Fairview Avenue was originally called Love Lane, please comment with your ideas!